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From famine to food waste: time to reflect

Beijing is starting localised food waste schemes as China looks to tackle food scarcity and rubbish disposal

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About 70% of national waste in China is food (Image by Gary Soup)

As a major producer and consumer of agricultural products on the planet, China faces a serious problem of food waste as it takes off towards sustainable urbanisation and industrialisation. In order to mend the cycle of food, it is critical for all groups in society to recognise the issue in an environmental context, and face the challenge collaboratively.
 
Released two months ago, Back to 1942, a film telling the story of a famine in Henan Province during World War II, spurred discussion about the Great Famine in the early 1960s, one of the post effects of the Great Leap Forward that still affects the food consumption psyche of the average Chinese. The Great Famine encouraged the world to analyse China's food security, as outlined in Lester Brown's 1995 book Who Will Feed China?
 
Ironically, in a university cafeteria in Beijing, one can see students throwing away about one third of their food. “That’s normal,” said one student, “we seldom pack up leftovers. If nobody asks, I won’t ask. And it’s inconvenient because we don’t have a microwave oven in our dorm to reheat it.” 
 
Then why order more than enough? “Well, it looks good to have at least the same number of dishes as the number of people. Common sense, isn’t it?” This is an example of what has become an underlying problem: the desire to appear abundant. This problem leads to extensive waste when the bill is paid with public funds. 
 
This problem shines a light on the lack of basic components in the education system – knowledge about Planet Earth. When dumping food becomes so easy for young people, it is extremely difficult for any society to step into sustainability.

Mountains of food waste
 
The facts about food waste might be more disturbing than one could imagine. Recently, the Institution of Mechanical Engineers released a report on food waste, estimating that 30-50% of annual global food production is wasted. The astonishing result covers food lost during harvesting, storage and transportation, as well as that thrown away by retailers and consumers. 

Read also: why half the food produced never reaches our stomachs
 
In China, about 70% of national waste is food, and food makes up 61% of household waste. Researchers from China Agricultural University studied data from 2006 to 2008 and found that edible food thrown away from restaurants each year is equivalent to nearly 10% of the country’s annual crop production, which is enough to feed 200 million people. When including the waste from schools, businesses and households, the number can easily reach 300 million people. 
 
In response to these numbers, a Clean Plate Initiative is heating up the social networks right now, advocating zero food waste when dining out. As the movement has spread, an increasing number of netizens, including familiar faces and food businesses, have joined in. More and more people have become aware of the issue and are acting. Good news and good timing, given the Chinese Spring Festival is the biggest feast of the year.
 
Yet the story does not end at dining tables. To complete the cycle of nature, what grows from the soil needs to return to the soil, regardless of the pathway.

Recycling and food waste
 
Nutrition that could save people from hunger is not the only thing being carelessly wasted; the already scarce natural resources used to grow the food, such as land and fresh water are also wasted. In addition, conventional landfill practices release greenhouse gases (GHGs) and other harmful chemicals due to microbial fermentation of the food waste, which is rich in organic matter and often wet. 
 
When dumping animal-based foods like beef, the impact on climate is triple that of plant-based foods because of animal protein’s higher emissions intensity. This fact does not even include the wasted resources and related sewage discharge, which destroy the planet’s ecosystems in the production process of animal-based foods. 
 
When people are lifted off the ground and put into skyscrapers, life becomes more convenient as the distance from the soil grows. However, because of this removal, we need to remind ourselves of these inconvenient truths behind our industrialised food systems. Action is still required on our part to complete the system, using mechanisms such as food scraps recycling.
 
As one of the first national pilots, Beijing implemented garbage sorting in 2000. In March, 2012, the Beijing Municipal Garbage Management Ordinance came into force, which encouraged communities and households to participate in kitchen waste recycling. 
 
Unfortunately, like many other environment-related tasks, this one is also thorny. According to official statistics, by 2011, 50% of municipal garbage was sorted enough for recycling. However, a study carried out by Tsinghua University revealed that, for the same year, only 4.4% of sampled communities met the standard. Some people say the shortfall is all about incentives, but is that so?
 
Not necessarily. The pathway linking the household recycling bin and the eventual treatment system is not primed, nor is the handling capacity strong enough. Every day in Beijing alone, households generate 11,000 tonnes of kitchen waste, and restaurants generate 2,500 tonnes. But the four municipal kitchen waste management facilities altogether can only handle 1,200 tonnes each day – that is less than 10% of what’s needed. As a result, in a large amount of communities, recycling bin contents head to the same destination as other waste – landfills or incineration plants. 
 
Despite this, there are still residents who choose to add another container in the kitchen, for food scraps only, even knowing the collector will possibly mix them with other trash. The will is there, calling for a real system that flows and circles, equipped with both regulation and education.
 
Ideas from Beijing and New York
 
Under double pressure from resource scarcity and climate change, our planet needs to get the consumption pattern fixed and the recycling system running. Improving the existing methodology is not enough; various innovative ideas should be tried out at the same time. 
 
On the consumption side, reducing food waste is quite simple, but education needs to be strengthened. Food businesses like restaurants and grocery stores also have the responsibility and incentive to minimise food waste and should guide customers to do so as well. A food bank is yet to be introduced to mainland China, but given the country’s issues with food waste and income inequality in cities, the idea definitely deserves attention from local communities and NGOs.
 
New York City is showcasing a practical method for collecting food scraps. At Greenmarkets, people voluntarily drop off their food scraps at composting sites. Not everyone participates, but 450 tonnes (1 million pounds) of food scraps have been recycled since 2007 through Greenmarkets alone. In China, wet markets are already part of many people’s daily lives. It is easy to imagine a similar circle, in which citizens bring their kitchen waste to the markets once a week, take fresh produces back home, and continue the cycle the next week. 
 
Also, for a sprawling city like Beijing, localised food scrap collection would greatly reduce the harmful emissions produced during transporting of food scraps. The city's Xicheng District is going to push on-site treatment in 2013, starting with collection from large canteens and restaurants. If planned well, nearby green spaces can also benefit from the organic fertilisers generated. This would have the added bonus of education, as citizens could see the benefits of food scrap collection in their communities. 

Perhaps there's another feedback loop there too. When people start giving wasted food a second look by sorting out garbage or storing food scraps for compost, a voice in the head may remind us to clean our plates whenever possible. After all, we, as part of the planet, can’t afford the loss. 

This is a guest post from Wanqing Zhou, a research Intern at Worldwatch Institute. The blog first appeared on
Brighter Green.

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Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

好文!發人深省!

此文給人以深刻啓發。爲了可持續發展,一方面要節約地球可提供的資源,另一方面,我們廢棄的東西儘量不要給地球造成更多的負擔。萬物來源於地球,又能自然回歸地球,我們要努力維持這一良性循環。紐約綠色市場回收廚余垃圾的做法值得推廣,可以詳細介紹一下。
另,第三段“在北京一所的大学餐厅里”是否應為“在北京的一所大學餐廳”?

Excellent article! Inspiring!

This article is enlightening. To achieve sustainable development, on one hand we need to save earth's resources and on the other hand we need to reduce the burden of waste. Everything comes from the earth and goes back to the earth. We need to keep this virtuous cycle. The food scraps collecting points in the green market in New York are worthy of promotion and more details would be welcome.

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

改善浪费还需提高意识

浪费问题有多方面的原因,但是人的意识是其中一个比较主要的方面。从自身点滴做起,从提高全民意识浪费的严重性做起,我相信通过政府相关政策的推动和媒体的强力宣传,国民必定能意识到浪费的严重性和节约的重要性,从而有所改善,是社会环境、生态环境、人文环境变得更好。

awareness need to be raised on food waste

There are many reasons behind food wasting behaviour. A major one is awareness. Awareness could be raised if local and central governments establish relevant regulations and the media works on promotion. That way, the social and ecological environment would improve.

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

国家仍在采取错误的步骤

国家发改委要通过干预天气来确保农作物生产。这在我看来就是“饮鸩止渴”。

粮食安全呢非常重要,尤其是在气候变化的大背景下。我同意我们应当尝试不同的手段,只不过不应该是进行天气干预。

The country is still taking wrong steps

The NDRC is going to use stronger weather interference to secure its growth in crop production, which to me sounds like “drinking poison to quench thirst”.

Food security is critical, especially under the changing climate, and I agree that we should try various methods. But probably not like this one.

http://www.cma.gov.cn/2011xwzx/2011xqxxw/2011xqxyw/201302/t20130206_204989.html

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

国人对待食品浪费的态度需转变

一篇好文章。在我看来,最值得思考的地方在于为何国人对食物浪费习以为常。改变食品浪费这种现状,一方面需要借助很好的制度手段和技术手段,如文章中提到的剩食物的回收机制和垃圾分类机制;另一方面也需要着力改变国人对于食物浪费的态度(表现在文中受访大学生)。没有正确的思想就不可能有正确的行动。我想,回答好以下两个问题对于转变国人的态度很重要:一是“为何在经济较为发达的今天我们依然要保持勤俭节约的精神?”另一个是:“为什么食物浪费并不能给人们脸上增光?”

Chinese attitudes in food need to be altered

This is a very good article. The question is why Chinese people are so used to wasting food.To change this situation, institutional and technical mechanisms are needed, like food recycling and waste categorisation mentioned in the article. On the other hand, the Chinese attitudes toward food need to be altered (as proved by the interviews with college students). Actions are not be achieved without the right attitude. Two questions are worth thinking about: why should we be frugal when the economy is prosperous? And why does wasting food lose you face?

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

高校学生与食物浪费

我国高校众多,学生数量十分庞大。他们当中的大多数人想当然的认为食物获得轻而易举,或者说只要拥有财富就可以不愁吃喝,因而忽视了甚至是漠视粮食的重要性。食堂随便丢弃饭菜随处可见,看了此文,我觉得更要加强对大学生的节约粮食的意识,提高大学生的素质。故大学生注重食物节约,是个人价值观的良好体现,是传统美德的优秀传承,是为国家粮食安全作一己之贡献,是为人类世界的资源节约尽一份绵薄之力。

College students and food waste

China has a large number of college students. Many of them reckon that food is easy to get as long as they have money, so they ignored the importance of food. Food scraps could be found anywhere in a college canteen. After reading this article, I realised that it is crucial to raise the awareness of college students on saving food. It is also a virtue, reflecting a person's value system. Saving food contributes to national food security, as well as to the world resources.