中国与世界,环境危机大家谈

china and the world discuss the environment

  • linkedin group
  • sini weibo
  • facebook
  • twitter
envelope

注册订阅每周免费邮件
Sign up for email updates


博客 Blog

My angst over China's role in the endangered wildlife trade

Grace Gabriel

Readinch

China must turn its back on the trade in endangered wildlife like tigers, elephants, chimpanzees and sharks, says IFAW's Grace Gabriel

article image

The trade in illegal animal products is driving endangered animals to extinction (Copyright: Xiao Shibai)

 
The recent meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) seriously challenged my mental tolerance.

To be honest, I had long expected the international community to blame China for the runaway trade in ivory, which has been disastrous for Africa’s elephants. But what I really didn’t expect was that the criticisms levied at China were far, far more vehement than this: tigers, rhinoceros, chimpanzees, Saiga antelopes, sharks, tortoises,  pangolins… any endangered species you can think of, all trade in that their survival was linked to demand from Chinese people.
In environmental circles, “Eaten by China” has long been a more famous saying than “Made in China”. At this conference, “China” was one of the most frequently used keywords. Of course, this wasn’t being used in a good way. At the conference venue, in every delegate’s proposal on a species was an appeal to China to lower its consumption of endangered species: a documentary playing on the sidelines of the conference said that the two Chinese characters for “ivory” have become a word that every African vendor now knows how to say.

A visit by a Chinese group to a country can surprisingly raise the local price of ivory. According to statistics from Kenya’s wildlife protection bureau, every year 95% of those who are caught smuggling ivory out of Nairobi Airport are Chinese people.
 
I am left speechless by this kind of Chinese cultural “export” to the world. As a Chinese person myself, I have very mixed feelings. On the one hand, I feel ashamed for China becoming a target of criticism from all sides. But on the other hand, I am eagerly hoping that threats to species’ survival can be solved as soon as possible.  

In the middle of this mixture of shame and impatience is indignation. Even though the facts are clear and the evidence is ample, facing censure from the international community, still we have officials disregarding China’s international role and image, turning a blind eye to wildlife in crisis, and finding all sorts of pretexts to shirk their responsibilities.
 
No matter what corner of the world you are in, as a Chinese person you will always be happy for every little bit of progress that China makes, and you feel more confident because your nation is powerful. For all Chinese people, “China” no longer simply means a certain special kind of political landscape and 960 square kilometres of mainland territory. “China” is a kind of relationship that anyone whose “roots and lifeblood” come from here or whose “leaves and branches” grew here cannot cut themselves away from. 
 
In New York’s famous Time’s Square, we saw China’s national image advertisement broadcast over and over again. It was unprecedentedly imposing. Of course the cost to broadcast this kind of ad at the centre of the world would be considerable. But, can money can really buy an image upgrade? Can it buy other people’s approval of China?

As the world’s second-biggest economy, China certainly doesn’t lack political, economic, military and diplomatic hard power, but rather in knowing how to assimilate with the rest of the world and make other people genuinely respect and revere this civilized country’s values from their hearts. How China handles wildlife comes down to a question of its values. On the one hand, China is spending money on advertising, to buy respect, to buy approval, while on the other hand, it is spending money on buying wildlife, to buy abuse, and to buy insults.
 
What we need to note in particular is that this kind of large-scale trade and consumption of wildlife has never been part of Chinese “traditions” or “culture”.  It is the disastrous and abnormal consequences of today’s highly-industrialized chain of wildlife poaching, smuggling, transportation, and trade. Those engaged in the business and buyers have never been the public at large but rather a minority of people! Ivory collectors, those who drink tiger bone wine, eaters of shark’s fin soup, wearers of tortoiseshell, those who hang up polar bear’s heads, not a single one of them is a regular consumer from the general public. It is a handful of Chinese people with their extravagant requirements that have brought such disgrace and blame, but it is the country that must foot the bill.
 
Rejecting the consumption of wildlife is firstly a government matter. China must frankly and honestly face this issue, accept its responsibility bravely, not become deceitful, not pass the buck, firmly enforce existing laws, and strictly carry out laws and regulations, before it can properly establish a minimum standard of environmental ethics for society as a whole. A value system where profit is sought from using wild animal skins, bones and flesh, must be fundamentally transformed from within existing regulatory policies and legislation.

Using wild animals to satisfy a minority of people’s demands offers short-term and small gains. It infringes on the majority of people’s ecological benefits, it forfeits the nation’s interests and ruins its image, so that it loses its righteousness. There should be ample deliberation of this during government decision-making; it’s also not hard to weigh up the pros and cons.
 
Rejecting the consumption of wildlife is also every a matter for every Chinese person, to  control one’s desires, action must be taken now. Our 5,000 years of civilisation is brimming with knowledge and ethics on how to coexist with nature, and not about digging our own grave, and jeopardising our future with our arrogance and stupidity. 
 
Grace Gabriel is Asia Regional Director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)

评论 comments

8

评论 comments

中文

EN

嗨 Hi Guest user

退出 Logout /


发表评论 Post a comment

评论通过管理员审核后翻译成中文或英文 最大字符 1200

Comments are translated into either Chinese or English after being moderated. Maximum characters 1200

排序 Sort By:

早该如此

真是篇好文章 - 谢谢

About time

What a wonderful article - thank you


OMG 为犀牛请愿

我们有什么办法可以召集中国学生给我们写信,由我们转给祖马总统请他帮忙制止偷猎行为并让他知道下一代人已经意识到了这一问题且已准备好帮助停止偷猎?

http://onemoregeneration.org/2012/07/20/dear-president-zuma/

OMG Rhino Letter Writing Campaign

How can we get students from China to send us letters to President Zuma asking him to help stop poaching and to let him know that the next generation is aware of the problem and ready to help stop poaching?

http://onemoregeneration.org/2012/07/20/dear-president-zuma/


Vijay

中国人沉迷于动物产品。这种迷恋现在已经到了疯狂的程度。这种对动物产品的需求助长了国际犯罪集团的发展,中国是其最大的市场。中国的动物爱好者必须采取行动,告诉人们不要购买和使用濒危动物产品。

vijay

Chinese are fascinated by animal products. This fascination has gone berserk now. The demand for animal products has led to the development of an international mafia and China is the biggest market.Chinese animal lovers must campaign with the people to ask them not to use endangered animal products.


每年有三万五千只大象因象牙而遭无情屠杀

每天有100头非洲大象死于象牙贸易。没有买卖,就没有杀戮......

葛芮,你敢于在直言指出,在每天100头非洲象因象牙被屠杀问题上,中国政府的领导力可谓是彻底的失败,对此,我对你表达尊敬和赞赏。

在《濒危野生动植物物种国际贸易公约》大会上,据记载在2013年3月7日就大象问题的讨论中,中国代表说过这样的话......我引用过来

“-中国对非法贸易的上升势头表达关注之情。
-中国承认国际合作的必要性,但也强调停止偷猎的主要责任在于非洲国家。
-中国对人们把注意力集中在亚洲国家上表示遗憾。”

(1)
中国表现得像一个任性的孩子!我恳请中国所有有良知的人-停止买象牙,停止卖象牙,停止杀害非洲大象。在你们的文化中,崇敬动物,热爱动物-但当最后一头大象死去时-你们的崇敬是如何体现的?
Jude Price
www.elephantectivism.org
(1)来源:Earth Negotiations Bulletin. Volume 21 Number 78 - Friday, 8 March 2013. CITES COP16 HIGHLIGHTS/ Thursday, 7 March 2013

每年有三萬五千隻大象因象牙而遭無情屠殺

Every day 100 African Elephants die for the trade in ivory.
When the buying stops, the killing can too....
I respect and applaud you Gabriel for speaking out in your country about the utter failure of leadership by the Chinese Government on the issue of 100's of African elephants being slaughtered every day for their tusks. At CITES the Chinese delegate is recorded as saying in Elephant Discussions on 7 March 2013...and I quote
"- China expressed concern about the rise of the illegal trade.
- China acknowledged the need for int. cooperation but stressed the main responsibility for stopping the poaching was the African Range States responsibility.
- China lamented the focus on Asian countries."(1)
China is acting like a petulant schoolboy! Please, I appeal to all people in China of good conscience - stop buying Ivory, stop selling ivory, stop killing Africa's elephants. For the love of these great animals who your culture reveres - when the last elephant is dead - what reverence did you hold?
Jude Price
www.elephantectivism.org
(1) Source: Earth Negotiations Bulletin. Volume 21 Number 78 - Friday, 8 March 2013. CITES COP16 HIGHLIGHTS/ Thursday, 7 March 2013


遗憾的是,中国政府似乎毫不关心自己的环境,那些含有毒的土地上还居住着很多贫困人口,更别提关心其它国家的濒危物种了。

国家地理杂志的一则报道揭示了政府官员是如何与贩卖者串通一气,如何拉高价格、赚取高额利润,如何促使无知而没有受过教育的被宠坏了的有钱人消费象牙。只要政府官员和他们的贩卖者朋友能赚到钱,他们就不会关心长远的生态恶果。

Unfortunately, China's government hardly cares about its own environment, especially toxic lands where the poor are currently suffering in, much less endangered species from other countries.

An exposé from National Geographic shows how government officials are colliding with traders, driving up prices, making a healthy profit, enabling the ignorant and uneducated spoiled rich elite in consuming ivory. As long as the communist party members and their cozy trader friends can make a profit, they don't care what the long term ecological consequences are.


Joyce Poole

葛芮,谢谢您,这篇文章意义重大。

Joyce Poole

Thank you Grace for this important article.


露娜

你提到,出于自身利益猎杀野生动物的是少部分人,这个观点很有意思。根据我的经验,在政府积极做出改变之前,很多人就非常反对政府的不作为行为。希望改变快一点到来,因为对很多物种来说时间已经不多了!

Luna

Interesting you note that it is a minority of people exploiting wildlife for their own gains. In my experience it has to be the majority of people who stand firm against the Government before they actively make changes. May the changes come quickly because time is running out for many species!


评论都到哪儿去了?

你好,我发过一条评论,但是我不知道它和其他一些评论现在哪儿去了。我喜欢阅读人们深思熟虑后写出的评论。

Where are the comments?

Hi, I posted a comment and wonder where it, any others, may appear. I'm interested in reading what people have to say about your well-thought-out comments.


合作伙伴 Partners

项目 Projects